Dr Quinton Accone

BSc MBBCH MCFP MBA FC Orth (SA)
Specialist Orthopaedic Surgeon
Practice no. 0411256

Knee Replacement

Knee replacement, or knee arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace the weight-bearing surfaces of the knee joint to relieve the pain and disability of osteoarthritis.

 

It may be performed for other knee diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In patients with severe deformity from advanced rheumatoid arthritis, trauma or long standing osteoarthritis, the surgery may be more complicated and carry higher risk.

Osteoporosis does not typically cause knee pain, deformity, or inflammation and is not a reason to perform knee replacement.. Other major causes of debilitating pain include meniscus tears, cartilage defects, and ligament tears. Debilitating pain from osteoarthritis is much more common in the elderly. Knee replacement surgery can be performed as a partial or a total knee replacement.

In general, the surgery consists of replacing the diseased or damaged joint surfaces of the knee with metal and plastic components shaped to allow continued motion of the knee. The operation involves substantial postoperative pain, and includes vigorous physical rehabilitation. The recovery period may be 6 weeks or longer and may involve the use of mobility aids (e.g. walking frames, canes, crutches) to enable the patient´s return to preoperative mobility.

Indications
Knee replacement surgery is most commonly performed in people with advanced osteoarthritis. It should be considered when conservative treatments have been exhausted. Physical therapy has been shown to improve function and may delay or prevent the need for knee replacement. You will notice extreme pain when performing physical activities requiring a wide range of motion in the knee joint.

Pre-operative preparation
Knee arthroplasty is major surgery. Pre-opperative preparation begins immediately following surgical consultation and lasts approximately one month. Patient is to perform range of motion exercises and hip, knee and ankle strengthening as directed daily. Before the surgery is performed, pre-operative tests are done: usually a complete blood count, electrolytes, APTT and PT to measure blood clotting, chest X-rays, ECG, and blood cross-matching for possible transfusion.

About a month before the surgery, the patient may be prescribed supplemental iron to boost the hemoglobin in their blood system. Accurate X-rays of the affected knee are needed to measure the size of components which will be needed. Medications such as warfarin and aspirin will be stopped some days before surgery to reduce the amount of bleeding. Patients may be admitted on the day of surgery if the pre-op work-up is done in the pre-anesthetic clinic or may come into hospital one or more days before surgery. Some hospitals offer a pre-operative seminar for this surgery technique.

The surgery involves exposure of the front of the knee, with detachment of part of the quadriceps muscle (vastus medialis) from the patella. The patella is displaced to one side of the joint allowing exposure of the distal end of the femur and the proximal end of the tibia. The ends of these bones are then accurately cut to shape using cutting guides oriented to the long axis of the bones. The cartilages and the anterior cruciate ligament are removed; the posterior cruciate ligament may also be removed but the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments are preserved.

Metal components are then impacted onto the bone or fixed using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. A round ended implant is used for the femur, mimicking the natural shape of the bone. On the tibia the component is flat, although it often has a stem which goes down inside the bone for further stability. A flattened or slightly dished high density polyethylene surface is then inserted onto the tibial component so that the weight is transferred metal to plastic not metal to metal.

During the operation any deformities must be corrected, and the ligaments balanced so that the knee has a good range of movement and is stable. In some cases the articular surface of the patella is also removed and replaced by a polyethylene button cemented to the posterior surface of the patella. In other cases, the patella is replaced unaltered.

Better Health Care is Our Mission

Life Healthcare Bedford Gardens

Suite 18 Medial Suites,
3 Bradford Rd,
Bedford Gardens,
2007

011-615-9284
doctor@acconeorthopaedic.co.za

Morningside Medi-Clinic

Room 206 2nd Floor
Mediclinic Morningside,
Cnr Rivonia & Hill Road, Morningside,
2196

011-282-5357
qaccone@gmail.com